Journal Entry – Sunday April 29th 1917

A whole week of perfect weather. Bright sun, but still not really hot, as the wind is cold. Mary Shaw came here on Thursday. Mr Franchelian went away that day. His ship was supposed to sale in the afternoon from Plymouth for Mombasa, via Cape Town. We hope he will have time to see Agnes on the way. I had the letter affixed to this page on Wednesday, from Mrs Collinson. It is a wonderful example of unselfish bravery, in its there is no word of herself or her sorrow, truly the world is full of beautiful characters. On Friday...

Journal Entry – Thursday April 19th 1917

George Collinson has been killed in an aeroplane accident in Scotland. He was buried yesterday morning in Mary Stowe churchyard. Father Dorothea & I went over to the service. Mrs Collinson we hear is wonderfully brave, but it is a terrible blow to her, as he was all she lived for, & he was such a nice boy & good son. The fighting in France is now terrific. The French have begun their attack & taken 17,000 prisoners & many guns, our army is also taking many prisoners, & making furious attacks on the enemy. It really seems now as...

Journal Entry – Sunday April 15th 1917

The Winter has returned again. Last week we had snow most days & a few blizzards & thunderstorms thrown in, & an icy wind. It is too depressing for words. Mary came home on Thursday in holy week & stayed until Monday. Even appeared on Monday. He is going to France to work in canteens. We had a fine Easter morning, but later in the day the good old hail etc returned. America has now declared war & on Easter Monday we began our big push & have gone forward & taken many prisoners & gains etc. The news is...

Journal Entry – Wednesday April 4th 1917

Winter back again. All last week the wind was bitter & on Thursday morning there was snow. Every day since it has snowed & on Monday, Tuesday extra special line in snowstorms, with high wind. Father has had a very nasty cold, being on the for more than a week & children also have colds. Yesterday I went to Exeter to meet Nicholas, had a perilous journey to the station, the snow balled in the Abbots hoofs, Wilcox had to lead him down the steep hill. At Exeter had only two hours. Went to Number One hospital, saw Bert Clogg....

Journal Entry – Monday March 26th 1917

Brightest day, but bitter wind. The children & I went to Yeomans Mill to take Mr Neale & his nephew cards about National Service. Mr Neale told me a wonderful tale that he had heard from the morning postman, namely that 30,000 Germans had landed in England, & that all the soldiers on leave had been recalled on Saturday & that six express trains had gone up from the West during the weekend full of men returning from leave. It was a fine tale but the very unreliable source may be doubted. Anyhow it made father used at teatime. We...

Journal Entry – Sunday March 25th 1917

Another fine day. We were excited this morning at seeing 21 pheasants in the field by the lawn. Elizabeth & Philippa were very interested. In the afternoon went down to Yalford to inquire for Nora Guscott who is very ill. The revolution in Russia is a big thing. The Emperor and Empress are prisoners. Our if only Germany would follow suit & pop the Kaiser & his sons into a prison, perhaps the war would cease. Am reading Wells’ new book, “War & the future.” In it he states that the development of the tanks will be perhaps the means...

Journal Entry – Wednesday March 21th 1917

Father says the wind is N.E. Dorothea says N.W. Which am I to believe? Anyhow it was cold wherever it was. It is also the birthday of the great Dorothea Juliana Drewe. D and I drove to Haine. We saw the baby, poor little thing she looks very frightened. This retreat of the Germans is evidently a clever move affairs, as they have destroyed everything on their way. Some authorities consider that by doing it now, they have hindered us from making any big move forward this summer.

Journal Entry – Monday March 19th 1917

Our troops have taken Bapaume & Péronne. The heading in the paper to day was “Germans crumpling up.” The Russians are to have Duke Michael as Tsar, & the Emperor Nicholas retires. We wonder what is the real truth of it all it is so difficult to find out anything from the papers as they are so one sided. The Turks are fleeing, so altogether we feel more cheered to day, if only we could hear some news of Bob.

Journal Entry – Friday March 16th 1917

Bag dad is taken by our army. It was entered on Sunday & by now they are about 30 miles n of it. This ought to mean something, anyhow it cheers us up. In to days paper is the startling news that the Tsar has abdicated. There have been terrible riots in Petrograd, food riots. & Now the Duma wishes to have real power instead of being a mere letter. There is also a feeling that the government & the Imperial party are in the pay of the Germans. This however is only what we gather from the newspapers of...

Journal Entry – Monday February 26th 1917

Another move forwards on the Ancre. Serre has been taken. The Germans have withdrawn their troops. We have now at this point in front of our trenches a piece of ground unbroken with shell holes. Lloyd George has made a statement that certain imports are to be forbidden, but that will not affect us much. The potatoe question is a very burning one, the price is very high & some people think that farmers are holding up supplies in case that the price should go up. In the meantime poor people who depend very largely upon potatoes for food have...

Journal Entry – Tuesday February 20th 1917 Shrove Tuesday

The War Loan has bee a great success. Mr Bonar Law last night in the House made the statement that £700,000,000 had been subscribed & more is coming in. Here in this parish Miss Miller has taken it up & has collected £113 chiefly through the children of the school. It is extraordinary what a number of people have a hoard of gold & we were asked long ago to give up all gold. Father & Arthur went in to Tavistock to Kelly College meeting consequently the former was not able to make his famous quotation at lunch. In afternoon...

Journal Entry – Sunday February 18th 1917

The thaw has come at last. It began on Monday, but the ice has not gone yet. I can still stand on the lily pond, but the flowers are beginning to show . The snowdrops have come up with a rush. Yesterday Father heard from Highbury that Uncle Joe was very ill & we fear this may be the end. Bob’s kit has returned from France. Ellis & I unpacked it on Thursday. Mr Moore’s brother who is in the Lincolns is home on sick leave. He has been wounded & was in hospital in Boulogne. One day this week...

Journal Entry – Tuesday February 13th 1917

Mr Gerard has left Berlin, but still America is uncertain about what she intends to do, it almost seems now as if she will patch it up again on as before. The thaw has come at last but the wind is still cold. Yest Dorothea went to Buckfastleigh & I walked over to Landue with bag in hand & spent the night there, Sophie & Mrs Tregonning were the only ones at home. I had a most pleasant evening there. Mrs T amused me much by her views on the war & was exceedingly bitter against the Prussians & looks...

Journal Entry – Friday February 9th 1917

Only 7 degrees last night. Heard from Father describing Gerald’s wedding. It was a very quiet affair. This morning Dorothea and I both noticed a curious noise. At first I thought it was a Aroplane but it was too steady & continuous & sounded like the sea. Balsdon told us it was the East wind roaring on Dartmoor & this evening after tea we went to the front door & heard it again, a steady rustling noise of wind & yet it was quite still here. Elizabeth & I walked to Milton to inquire at the Post Office about the...

Journal Entry – Monday February 5th 1917

Very cold day. America has withdrawn her Ambassador from Berlin & Count Bernstorff has been handed his papers at Washington. This looks as if America means to act, but I hope she will not come in. There are enough nations fighting. This submarine menace is the last resort of the enemy. The Zepps have failed & her army on the Western Front can not make any headway. now it comes to this, either Germany is starved out or we are starved out. A list of food regulations is published to day. 2 ½ lbs of meat per head per week,...

Journal Entry – Saturday February 3rd 1917

Returned home on Thursday. The weather has been bitter, & in that little house in Wimbledon it was impossible to get warm. None of the doors or windows fit, gales blow all round you when you sit in any of the rooms. There is a large crack in the house from top to bottom & the ceiling in one of the rooms was momentarily expected to fall. Yet for all this Frank, Ursula & Juliana live a happy life. I had a nice time running up to town most days & seeing several of my friends. Had tea at Wimb....